Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Hydrangea in Winter


Hydrangea in Winter

Well, winter made its presence known today with a storm (some are calling it a blizzard) that dropped snow on a large portion of the Northeast. We were lucky, with only a few inches in our area as opposed to a couple of feet in New York and Boston. More snow is being predicted for Monday. But that is days away and there are things to be done now.

We had to shovel, of course, and the township trucks were on the job early. The birds were a constant presence in our yard and the squirrels were digging into the snow for their buried acorn treasures. Rabbits left footprints as they looked for food. Everyone seemed busy.

But there is a quiet scene, too. In the midst of it all, Mother Nature is planning for the spring. With branches bare and its roots covered in snow, the hydrangea bush is laying on buds. It’s hard to imagine from the tight nubs the beautiful leaves and flowers that will delight us next season. The comfrey leaves have shriveled and gone yet I know the plant is only storing its energy and will return for another year. The hibiscus branches are white and brittle but they can’t fool me. Their blossoms will be dazzling late spring and well through the summer months.

It is the hydrangea bush, though, that is speaking to me now. I know some hydrangeas need shelter but mine have had an unsheltered life and still bloom. I am grateful for that. I sense its determination to survive and thrive despite difficulties. It reminds me that we all have things in life that are challenging and yet there is the hidden drive to blossom when we can, to let our inner selves support us until the right time comes to let the world see our beauty. Sometimes it’s hard to remember what’s inside but the hydrangea can remind us that it is worth the effort.

Taking care of your hydrangea:

Tons of comfrey facts:

What to grow in winter:


1 comment:

  1. When the summer season fades into fall, we obsess over one last-standing flowering shrub: the hydrangea care. It evokes an old-fashioned charm

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