Monday, March 5, 2018

Broken Tree

Broken Tree
This past week was full of a variety of weathers. It was raining. It was snowing. The wind was blowing like mad. And then the sun came out, lighting up the sky as if nothing had happened. But plenty had happened. It was a nor’easter that affected lots of people. Some people lost power. Neighborhoods all along the coasts expected flooding after the wind moved out to sea and would probably affect the tides coming in.

Our backyard trees weathered the onslaught but our neighbor’s Bradford Pear tree wasn’t so lucky. A large branch broke off, spreading wood and the buds of new leaves across both our yards. The downed branch fell onto a bush that has been in our yard for over forty years, each summer sending flowers and new stems as a reminder that summer was approaching. But it left both our roofs untouched, thank goodness.

It reminds me not to take anything for granted. Trees are so strong and impressive yet they, too, are part of the progression of life. It’s important to appreciate the present because that is all we truly have. Even as we plan for the future we can live moment to moment along the way. Which is good to remember because another rain/snow storm is expected tomorrow.

How the nor’easter affected the Boston area:

Monday, February 19, 2018

Turkey Vultures in Our Neighborhood

Turkey Vultures in Our Neighborhood

My neighborhood consists mostly of houses, a local elementary school, well-tended lawns and a variety of trees. It’s like most suburban developments except for an occasional aberration like I noticed yesterday. It seems that a clump of trees has become home to a bunch of turkey vultures.

I’ve seen these birds soaring overhead more frequently this year. Sometimes they come fairly close to rooftops and float over backyards. They usually come in groups, tilting their wings to catch the updrafts and maybe spot some carrion to eat. They aren’t exactly cute but they are impressive.

Why are they here? These birds used to be seen mostly in the southern states but since our climate has been warming, they now have moved into the north and have even been spotted in Canada.

The world of nature is shifting as we can see by the weather forecasts this season. We are expecting temps in the 70s for the next few days! I wonder what the birds will think of that. Perhaps we all need to be flexible as our world changes.

All about turkey vultures:

Tuesday, January 23, 2018

Groundhog Getting Ready for Winter

Groundhog Getting Ready for Winter

Back in September we saw this groundhog munching on the leaves of our peach tree, filling up in preparation for its winter hibernation. It wasn't planning on a long trip to get to its diggings, just a short hop past our property line to squiggle under our neighbor's deck. We have seen it enter and exit between the nicely planted shrubs many times during the other seasons but it would usually skitter away when it became aware of us. At this point, though, it was too busy to care.

With Groundhog’s Day coming up soon, everyone will be watching for that special animal known as Punxutawney Phil. The holiday started in the 1800s but is still the traditional weather predictor. If he sees his shadow, it means the sky is cold and clear, a prediction of six more weeks of winter. If there is no shadow, spring is on its way. For Punxutawney Phil it is not about seasons. It is all about reproduction. If it is too cold he will go back into his burrow for some more sleep and return in more comfortable temperatures.

Our neighbor knows the groundhog lives there but chooses not to evict it. Everyone, even a groundhog, needs a place to live.  Sometimes the place we imagine will be our forever lodgings, whether it is a particular house or neighborhood, state or country, ends up being temporary. It is not easy to move even if it is warranted. So many people today are on the move.

The groundhog next door is lucky. I admire our neighbor for being so caring. I hope the people who need to leave their special places find new, caring places to resettle, and others who will understand how hard it was to go.

General groundhog info: 
Groundhog Day info:

Saturday, January 13, 2018

Geese and Growth

Geese and Growth

It’s another winter, another year. So many things in nature shift with the seasons. Geese remind us of the coming cold as they honk their way south. The geese have moved to warmer climates by now, which is a good thing. We have had some record cold temps lately. I know they’ll be back in spring but as I watched them take off, I kind of missed them already.

People respond to the change in seasons as well. Someone I know says she is not a winter person. She hunkers inside during the winter weather and waits for the warm summer’s embrace. Another friend relishes the snow and cold and looks forward to getting out her skis. I kind of like the snow myself, even when I have to shovel. We each try to adjust in our own way to what Mother Nature brings.

As I looked at the geese honking their way south, I thought about this past year. It hasn’t been an easy time for me but, like the geese instinctively know, I sense it is time to move on. Come the spring the geese will return to familiar surroundings with a new perspective. It sounds like a plan for me, too.

As I watched the geese fly off, I wished them well and knew I would look forward to their return.

And now I wish everyone a healthy and happy – and rejuvenated - 2018!